1920 Flappers Took the Country by Storm – But Did They Ever Truly Go Away

Women of the Roaring Twenties had a lot in common with today’s millennials

By Linda Simon Smithsonian Magazine September 2017

Flappers Atop Chicago Hotel

She was the sexy ingénue, spending evenings in jazz clubs hazy with her cigarette smoke. She cavorted, wild and willful, in the stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald, who summed her up as “pretty, impudent, superbly assured, as worldly-wise, briefly-clad and ‘hard-berled’ as possible.”

The glamorous, shimmering flapper in her slinky dress and stylish bob seemed to emerge into American life out of nowhere after the First World War, but the term was already familiar by then. In 1890s Britain, in fact, “flapper” described a very young prostitute, and after the turn of the century, it was used on both sides of the Atlantic for cheeky, prepubescent girls whose long braids, the New York Times reported, “flapped in the wind.” Soon, a flapper was any girl or woman who defied convention—girls who balked at being chaperoned, suffragists, women aspiring to a career, and those, as the Boston Globe put it, “expert in the arts of allurement.”

Unlike their mothers and grandmothers, flappers tended to go to high school and even college, and they devoured new books featuring confident, fun-loving adolescent heroines who hiked and camped and solved mysteries. Flappers biked, played golf and tennis, and strove to emulate the flat-chested and hipless physiques of the adolescent boys whose freedom and lack of domestic responsibilities they envied.

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Immersive Theater Concept ‘The Speakeasy’ Returns With New Home This Summer

SPEAKEASY by Geri Koeppel
@gerikoeppel

The Speakeasy, an immersive theater experience in which audience members are engaged in the show, will reopen this summer in its permanent home, bringing flappers, mobsters and more to a secret location near the Chinatown-North Beach border every weekend.

The show started as a production of Boxcar Theatre, founded in 2005 by Nick A. Olivero, and had an initial sold-out run of 75 shows in 2014 at a “secret” location in the Tenderloin. It was done up to look like a Prohibition-era nightclub complete with a dance hall room and “gambling” den. The audience is required to dress in cocktail attire, and they’re encouraged to wear period clothing.

The_Speakeasy_1_photo_by_Peter_Liu

Presale tickets will go online at 10am June 9th to members of Club 1923 and affiliated groups. Tickets for the general public will go on sale June 13th. For information, online sales and to register as a Club 1923 member, which will have an annual fee, visit thespeakeasysf.com. Tickets for previews will be $85 and the regular run will be around $100; the cost of Club 1923 hasn’t been determined. READ MORE

SPEAKEASY – PROHIBITION FOR A CAUSE

MOULTRIE NEWS

East Cooper Breakfast Rotary celebrates 20 years of service Will host Speakeasy Prohibition For A Cause

To kickoff its 20th anniversary, East Cooper Breakfast Rotary Club will host a new fundraising event called “Speakeasy – Prohibition For A Cause.” Proceeds from the event will benefit East Cooper Community Outreach, My Sister’s House, and Rotary Charities that include Polio Plus, Happy Feet, and Toys For Tots.

The Speakeasy will be held Friday, September 23rd from 7-11 p.m. at Southerly Restaurant & Patio at 730 Coleman Blvd in Mount Pleasant. It will be an evening of 1920’s Prohibition-era fun including heavy hors d’oeuvres, open bar, dancing to live jazz and swing music with the Charleston Swing Dance Association, games, a live auction with themed packages, and a raffle for a grand prize of $5000 cash. Guests must be present to win the grand prize. READ MORE