Snow Storm 1920

1920 Video Shows How Chicago Dealt With Snowstorms Nearly 100 Years Ago

By Kelly Bauer | March 14, 2017

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This footage was filmed Jan. 24, 1920, for a news story by Fox Movietone that would have been shown in movie theaters. The snowfall came in what was described as a 32-mile-an-hour Nor’Easter that “whistled around Chicago’s ears” the day before.

The Tribune reported that the city used “seven new motor snow plows” it had recently bought and described how 500 men were scheduled to go through the Loop with hand shovels to scoop up the piles the new plows had created.

The winter of 1919-1920 had about 32 inches of snow in Chicago, about as much as last winter’s (2016-17) snowfall.

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“The Gold Rush” 1925 (silent film)

The Gold Rush

The Gold Rush is a 1925 American silent comedy film written, produced, directed by, and starring Charlie Chaplin in his Little Tramp role. The film also stars Georgia Hale, Mack Swain, Tom Murray, Henry Bergman, and Malcolm Waite. Chaplin declared several times that this was the film for which he most wanted to be remembered. Though a silent film, it received an Academy Awards nomination for Best Sound Recording.

Plot: The Lone Prospector, a valiant weakling, seeks fame and fortune with the sturdy men who marched across Chilkoot Pass into the great unknown in the mad rush for hidden gold in the Alaskan wilderness. The Lone Prospector, his soul fired by a great ambition, his inoffensive patience and his ill-chosen garb alike made him the target for the buffoonery of his comrades and the merciless rigours of the frozen North.

Caught in a terrific blizzard, the icy clutches of the storm almost claim him when he stumbles into the cabin of Black Larsen, renegade. Larsen, unpityingly, is thrusting him from the door back into the arms of death when Fate, which preserves the destinies of its simple children, appears in the person of Big Jim.

The renegade is subdued by Jim in a terrific battle, and the Lone Prospector and his rescuer occupy the cabin while their unwilling host is thrust forth to obtain food. Starvation almost claims the two until a bear intrudes and is killed to supply their larder.

Cast: Charlie Chaplin as The Tramp (labeled as The Lone Prospector) Georgia Hale as Georgia Mack Swain as Big Jim McKay Tom Murray as Black Larsen Malcolm Waite as Jack Cameron Henry Bergman as Hank Curtis

In 1953, the original 1925 film possibly entered the public domain in the USA, as Chaplin did not renew its copyright registration.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gold…

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Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin born in London, loved by his audiences and the ladies. He was married four times and had eleven children.

Sir Charles Chaplin 1920

Quotes:

  • Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot.
  • Nothing is permanent in this wicked world – not even our troubles.
  • We think too much and feel too little.

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Flappers In Focus

The Economist 1843

BY KASSIA ST CLAIR | SEPTEMBER 28TH 2016

Asked what women wore during the 1920’s, most people would picture the same thing: a drop-waisted dress, low-heeled Mary Jane shoes, a long string of pearls and a headband decorated with a diadem and a curling feather.

Designers were making clothes that reflected profound social and cultural change. The corseted silhouette of Victorian and Edwardian times was already becoming looser before the first world war, as simpler fashions and the drive for women’s suffrage caught on. The war, which forced women to enter the workforce in greater numbers, sped up the revolution: long skirts and trailing sleeves were serious impediments around factory machinery or on the farm.

Once the war was over, many women returned to their old lives, but the spirit of emancipation persisted. Women were gradually gaining political as well as economic power: over-thirties were given the vote in 1919 in Britain, and with fiancés and husbands killed on the battlefields, would-be housewives were forced to become financially independent. Meanwhile, the crumbling of the old social order and the growth in the retail sector meant that women that might once have gone into domestic service became shop girls, living in cities with a disposable income to spend on travelling, make-up, clothes, fashion magazines and cinema tickets.

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Yale University Library

Yale University

From the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Solomon Sir Jones Films, 1924-1928

The Solomon Sir Jones films consist of 29 silent black and white films documenting African-American communities in Oklahoma from 1924 to 1928.

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Old Ships of the Great Lakes 1920’s to 1961

December 5  by Dahmer

Take a look back in time with this slideshow to the Glory days of the great cross-lake passenger liners. Cross-lake steamers were an important part of transportation in the 1st part of the 20th century. These luxurious ships were fitted with interiors on a par with the Titanic. They ran year round in all types of weather. Voyages departed the ports of Muskegon, Grand Haven, and Holland Michigan for Chicago.

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Chicago Crime 1925 – 1932

Scarface, Tommy guns and Chicago’s gangster mystique in film

by Michael PhillipsChicago Tribune

Al Capone 1931 at a football game AP

Al Capone 1931 at a football game AP

In a a few, bloody years — 1925 to 1932, from the rise of Al Capone to the release of the film borrowing Capone’s nickname for a title — Chicago cemented its image in the popular imagination. The Cubs come and go; Chicago’s gangster mystique remains steadfast.

Here are six stops on the timeline of those key years in the making of Chicago’s corrupt, violent popular image.

1925: Brooklyn-born Alphonse Capone, later nicknamed “Scarface” by a Tribune reporter, takes over the Chicago activities of New York racketeer Johnny Torrio. By 1927, Capone is the world’s most revered and famous gangster, coddled by Chicago mayor Big Bill Thompson until Thompson considers Capone a drag on Thompson’s political advancement. By 1928 Capone relocates to Florida and spends most of the ’30s behind bars.

1926: Ex-Tribune police reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins writes a comedy about a couple of Chicago killers. Originally titled “Play Ball,” the play is renamed “Chicago” and opens on Broadway. Cecil B. DeMille produces a silent film version in 1927; Ginger Rogers stars in a 1942 film adpatation, “Roxie Hart”; Bob Fosse directs and choreographs the 1975 stage musical; the movie version of the musical wins the Academy Award as best picture of 2002.

1927: Another Chicago crime reporter, Bartlett Cormack, writes “The Racket,” a play set in a police precinct on Chicago’s outskirts, about an honest cop beset by corrupt superiors and pliable politicians in league with local bootleggers. The character of underworld kingpin Nick Scarsi is a thinly disguised Capone stand-in. Edward G. Robinson plays the role on stage; when the touring production of “The Racket” is banned from Chicago, reportedly at Capone’s urging, it travels instead to LA and the movies discover Robinson, who stars in “Little Caesar” in 1930, after the medium learns to talk and spit lead at high volume.

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Your Ticket to the Movies – 1926

“The General” 1926 Buster Keaton

In case you haven’t seen it, Buster Keaton’s “The General” is one of the greatest movies ever made. No hyperbole needed or used: the movie is the pinnacle of the silent film era, combining some of the most jaw-dropping stunts and hilarious physical comedy ever captured on celluloid. Read more from Jared Rasic’s article.

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The first talkie appeared a year later 1927 bringing about the end of an era.

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What It Meant When Lady Mary Bobbed Her Hair on ‘Downton Abbey’

Source

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In the final season of Emmy-nominated Downton Abbey, set in 1924, Lady Mary Talbot (née Crawley) debuted a new haircut: the bob. She was a little behind the times, as the cut had entered the mainstream in America starting in 1920, as women finally earned the right to vote and the Saturday Evening Post ran F. Scott Fitzgerald’s short story “Bernice Bobs Her Hair.” But for a member of the British aristocracy, cutting off one’s hair and moving away from corseted Victorian fashions marked a notable break with traditional ideas of what a woman should look like. In short: the bob, at the time,  was a haircut that made both a political and a cultural statement about what kind of woman one was. Read more from article

 

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Louise Brooks 1920’s read more

 

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Josephine Baker (1920’s)

Read more about “Tough Guy Stereotypes” from the 1920’s and 1930’s.

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