“The Gold Rush” 1925 (silent film)

The Gold Rush

The Gold Rush is a 1925 American silent comedy film written, produced, directed by, and starring Charlie Chaplin in his Little Tramp role. The film also stars Georgia Hale, Mack Swain, Tom Murray, Henry Bergman, and Malcolm Waite. Chaplin declared several times that this was the film for which he most wanted to be remembered. Though a silent film, it received an Academy Awards nomination for Best Sound Recording.

Plot: The Lone Prospector, a valiant weakling, seeks fame and fortune with the sturdy men who marched across Chilkoot Pass into the great unknown in the mad rush for hidden gold in the Alaskan wilderness. The Lone Prospector, his soul fired by a great ambition, his inoffensive patience and his ill-chosen garb alike made him the target for the buffoonery of his comrades and the merciless rigours of the frozen North.

Caught in a terrific blizzard, the icy clutches of the storm almost claim him when he stumbles into the cabin of Black Larsen, renegade. Larsen, unpityingly, is thrusting him from the door back into the arms of death when Fate, which preserves the destinies of its simple children, appears in the person of Big Jim.

The renegade is subdued by Jim in a terrific battle, and the Lone Prospector and his rescuer occupy the cabin while their unwilling host is thrust forth to obtain food. Starvation almost claims the two until a bear intrudes and is killed to supply their larder.

Cast: Charlie Chaplin as The Tramp (labeled as The Lone Prospector) Georgia Hale as Georgia Mack Swain as Big Jim McKay Tom Murray as Black Larsen Malcolm Waite as Jack Cameron Henry Bergman as Hank Curtis

In 1953, the original 1925 film possibly entered the public domain in the USA, as Chaplin did not renew its copyright registration.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Gold…

________________________________________________

Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin born in London, loved by his audiences and the ladies. He was married four times and had eleven children.

Sir Charles Chaplin 1920

Quotes:

  • Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up, but a comedy in long-shot.
  • Nothing is permanent in this wicked world – not even our troubles.
  • We think too much and feel too little.

Read More.

<<<  >>>

 

 

This car expert loves old Fords and rebuilds all the classics (photos)

Syracuse.com

By Kenn Peters July 21, 2016

Bridgeport, NY — If you’ve driven east or west on Route 31 through Bridgeport, you’ve passed an auto repair shop with very old cars parked in front. The shop is Chuck Nelson Auto & Truck Restorations, a shop that’s had a car show in its front yard for as long as anyone can remember.

The owner is Chuck Nelson, a guy who is arguably as much of an expert on old Fords as anyone’s going to find.

He’s fixed, repaired, rebuilt, figured out, painted, put back on the road, made look pretty and saved more Fords than he can remember.

Why Fords? “As a kid I was crazy about old Fords. In fact, I had an old Model A when I was 15,” he said. When Nelson was 15 lots of kids his age were wild about Fords, and Chevys and Plymouths, but for the most part they were cars that had V-8 motors, fancy two-tone paint jobs and loud glasspack mufflers.

READ MORE.

<<<  >>>

Flappers In Focus

The Economist 1843

BY KASSIA ST CLAIR | SEPTEMBER 28TH 2016

Asked what women wore during the 1920’s, most people would picture the same thing: a drop-waisted dress, low-heeled Mary Jane shoes, a long string of pearls and a headband decorated with a diadem and a curling feather.

Designers were making clothes that reflected profound social and cultural change. The corseted silhouette of Victorian and Edwardian times was already becoming looser before the first world war, as simpler fashions and the drive for women’s suffrage caught on. The war, which forced women to enter the workforce in greater numbers, sped up the revolution: long skirts and trailing sleeves were serious impediments around factory machinery or on the farm.

Once the war was over, many women returned to their old lives, but the spirit of emancipation persisted. Women were gradually gaining political as well as economic power: over-thirties were given the vote in 1919 in Britain, and with fiancés and husbands killed on the battlefields, would-be housewives were forced to become financially independent. Meanwhile, the crumbling of the old social order and the growth in the retail sector meant that women that might once have gone into domestic service became shop girls, living in cities with a disposable income to spend on travelling, make-up, clothes, fashion magazines and cinema tickets.

Read More.

<<<  >>>

Yale University Library

Yale University

From the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Solomon Sir Jones Films, 1924-1928

The Solomon Sir Jones films consist of 29 silent black and white films documenting African-American communities in Oklahoma from 1924 to 1928.

Read More

<<<  >>>

 

 

Old Ships of the Great Lakes 1920’s to 1961

December 5  by Dahmer

Take a look back in time with this slideshow to the Glory days of the great cross-lake passenger liners. Cross-lake steamers were an important part of transportation in the 1st part of the 20th century. These luxurious ships were fitted with interiors on a par with the Titanic. They ran year round in all types of weather. Voyages departed the ports of Muskegon, Grand Haven, and Holland Michigan for Chicago.

<<<  >>>

Alcatraz 1934

On this day in 1934, the first federal prisoners arrived on Alcatraz Island

By Katie Dowd Thursday, August 11, 2016

Eighty-two years ago today, Alcatraz went from a rock to The Rock.

On Aug. 11, 1934, the first boat loads of federal inmates arrived at Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary, entering American lore in the process.

alcatraz-prisioners

alcatraz-3

Alcatraz had been a military prison since the turn of the century, but it wasn’t until 1933 that it was purchased by the Department of Justice to serve as a maximum security facility for America’s worst criminals. It was, officials and newspapers declared, utterly escape-proof.

Most of the first inmates were transferred from Leavenworth in Kansas. They were bank robbers, murderers and counterfeiters. “Although the total population of Uncle Sam’s new fortress for incorrigibles will run into the hundreds, the 47 now ‘on hand’ will be sufficient to give Attorney General Homer S. Cummings an idea of the situation,” the Chronicle wrote upon their arrival.

Among the first shipment of prisoners was “Red” Kerr, a Chicago gangster who stole over $200,000 from a Sacramento post office and John M. Stadig, a “counterfeiter and escaper.” Its most famous inmate, unbeknownst to him, was being prepared for a similar move.

“Unusual precautions, it was learned, will be taken to safeguard several nationally known figures in the world of crime from Atlanta and Leavenworth penitentiaries to the prison in San Francisco bay,” the Chronicle revealed.

Nationally known was an understatement: On Aug. 20, the Chronicle found out that none other than Al Capone was on a heavily guarded train from Atlanta.

Capone had been secretly packed onto a custom steel-barred train car in the dead of the night, but word quickly spread that the Chicago mobster was traveling across the country.

The Chronicle reported that an onlooker called out to the other prisoners, asking if Capone was on the train. Another inmate pointed to a coach window. “The man in that window, who resembled Capone, grinned when asked whether he was Capone,” wrote the Chronicle.

Early on the morning of the 23rd, the train arrived in San Francisco. Capone and 52 other convicts were loaded onto a barge in Tiburon. Accompanied by an armed Coast Guard cutter, they sailed to Alcatraz.

“Al Capone, who iron nerve he boasted would never break, quailed when he viewed the escape proof ramparts of Alcatraz yesterday,” proclaimed the Chronicle.

al-capone-alcatraz

Indeed, Capone never attempted an escape from Alcatraz. His health declining, he spent much of his last year in the prison hospital. He finished his sentence at Alcatraz on Jan. 6, 1939. READ MORE.

<<<  >>>

 

 

Chicago Crime 1925 – 1932

Scarface, Tommy guns and Chicago’s gangster mystique in film

by Michael PhillipsChicago Tribune

Al Capone 1931 at a football game AP

Al Capone 1931 at a football game AP

In a a few, bloody years — 1925 to 1932, from the rise of Al Capone to the release of the film borrowing Capone’s nickname for a title — Chicago cemented its image in the popular imagination. The Cubs come and go; Chicago’s gangster mystique remains steadfast.

Here are six stops on the timeline of those key years in the making of Chicago’s corrupt, violent popular image.

1925: Brooklyn-born Alphonse Capone, later nicknamed “Scarface” by a Tribune reporter, takes over the Chicago activities of New York racketeer Johnny Torrio. By 1927, Capone is the world’s most revered and famous gangster, coddled by Chicago mayor Big Bill Thompson until Thompson considers Capone a drag on Thompson’s political advancement. By 1928 Capone relocates to Florida and spends most of the ’30s behind bars.

1926: Ex-Tribune police reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins writes a comedy about a couple of Chicago killers. Originally titled “Play Ball,” the play is renamed “Chicago” and opens on Broadway. Cecil B. DeMille produces a silent film version in 1927; Ginger Rogers stars in a 1942 film adpatation, “Roxie Hart”; Bob Fosse directs and choreographs the 1975 stage musical; the movie version of the musical wins the Academy Award as best picture of 2002.

1927: Another Chicago crime reporter, Bartlett Cormack, writes “The Racket,” a play set in a police precinct on Chicago’s outskirts, about an honest cop beset by corrupt superiors and pliable politicians in league with local bootleggers. The character of underworld kingpin Nick Scarsi is a thinly disguised Capone stand-in. Edward G. Robinson plays the role on stage; when the touring production of “The Racket” is banned from Chicago, reportedly at Capone’s urging, it travels instead to LA and the movies discover Robinson, who stars in “Little Caesar” in 1930, after the medium learns to talk and spit lead at high volume.

Read More.

<<<  >>>

Veteran’s Day: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Yesterday:

Mein Kampf written circa 1926 started the ball rolling. It ended in the liberation of concentration camps (like Auschwitz-Birkenau Belzec Bergen-Belsen Buchenwald Chelmno Dachau Ebensee Flossenbürg Gross-Rosen …).

Brave GI’s helped liberated these camps.

Today:

The question we need to ask is, “How is President-elect Donald Trump going to house the 11 million he is planning to round up?”

<<<  >>>

[Update: the 11 million (pre-election number) is now (post-election) two or three million.]

The Boxcar

15-Year-Old Buys 44,000-Pound Boxcar; Now Comes The Hard Part                                                                                               by Bill Leukhardt – Hartford Courant – Oct 27, 2016

boxcar-2

A country teen who paid $1 to buy a 1930 boxcar and save it from the scrapyard came here Wednesday to pick up his 44,000-pound purchase.

Orion Newall Vuillemot, a lanky 15-year-old from Woodstock who collects old tractors and makes maple syrup for sale, showed up at 7 a.m. at the Naugatuck Railroad Co. yard off Thomaston Avenue to collect his project.

“He’s always been interested in trains,” his mother, Jane Newall, said as Orion and a team of a dozen volunteers prepped the badly worn and weathered Boston & Maine boxcar – #72249 – from its longtime parking spot in the NRC yard. “When he said he was interested in this, I said, why not?”

boxcar-1

It led to Orion raising about $4,000 on a GoFundMe page, putting on a restaurant fundraiser in Putnam, and assembling a bunch of people interested in helping him bring his train car home to a 50-foot-long section of track he built in the family yard.

The Woodstock Academy sophomore calls the boxcar by its number, saying, “I plan to restore 72249.” He estimated the project might keep him busy until 2019 and said that once it’s done, he will likely donate it to a railway museum or someplace similar.

boxcar-3

The freight car now is mostly paint-bare wood, with blotches of faded red paint freckled on the boards and the exterior metal frame. So what color will it be?

“Boxcar red. It’s standard,” he said. “It’s almost brown.” READ MORE

<<<  >>>

UPDATE ARTICLE: Read what Planning and Zoning had to say when a kid put a railroad boxcar in his yard. 

<<<  >>>