Gal Gadot looks elegant in 1920s-inspired silver Givenchy gown on Oscars red carpet

By Dailymail.com Reporter

 

Her smash hit superhero film Wonder Woman is set during World War One (1914 – 1918).

But when she swung by the Oscars at Los Angeles’ Dolby Theatre on Sunday, Gal Gadot evoked the decade following the Great War- Flappers and the Roaring ’20’s.

The 32-year-old brought back the 1920s in a slinky sparkling Givenchy gown that dripped with fringe, playing up the flapper chic with slicked-down hair.

Some background:

Gal Gadot-Varsano is an Israeli actress and model. She was born and raised in Israel. At age 18 she was crowned Miss Israel 2004. She then served two years in the Israel Defense Forces as a combat instructor. -Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gal_Gadot 

IDF Photos:

 

Looks like proof that it’s time for equal pay, and just to be on the safe side, let’s throw in an an Inclusion Rider.   

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Edsel Ford’s 1934 Model 40 Custom Speedster

Edsel Ford commissioned a number of special automobiles from Ford Motor Company for his personal use. Each one spoke to his design talents. Edsel collaborated with designer Bob Gregorie to create this 1934 Model 40 Speedster. The sleek profile, custom aluminum body and flathead V-8 engine anticipated the hot rods that soon appeared on southern California streets. -Source HenryFord.org

Edsel Ford was all about form. Henry Ford cared only for function. Henry, the practical, conservative inventor who believed his Model T was all the car anyone from farmhand to millionaire would ever need, clashed with his well-traveled, cultured, and artistic prodigal son from the moment he named 25-year-old Edsel company president on New Year’s Day, 1919. The collision of Henry’s practical conservatism with Edsel’s Gatsby-esque cultural “elitism” is an American story plot that resounds to this day. -Source Motor Trend

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas

Marjory Stoneman

Senior at Wellesley College 1912

 

 Marjory Stoneman Douglas in later life:

Author Mary Joy Brenton provided a more comprehensive version of this quote in her book Women Pioneers For the Environment:

“Join a local environmental society, but see to it that it does not waste time on superficial purposes… Don’t think it is enough to attend meetings and sit there like a lump…. It is better to address envelopes than to attend foolish meetings. It is better to study than act too quickly; but it is best to be ready to act intelligently when the appropriate opportunity arises…

“Speak up. Learn to talk clearly and forcefully in public. Speak simply and not too long at a time, without over-emotion, always from sound preparation and knowledge. Be a nuisance where it counts, but don’t be a bore at any time… Do your part to inform and stimulate the public to join your action….

“Be depressed, discouraged and disappointed at failure and the disheartening effects of ignorance, greed, corruption and bad politics — but never give up.”

Marjory Stoneman Douglas was inducted to National Wildlife Federation Hall of Fame and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, and she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Bill Clinton in 1993. She died at age 108.

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A POLITICAL CLOWN 1920-1930

From Mein Kampf: “At first the claims of propaganda are so impudent that people think it insane; later, it gets on people’s nerves; and in the end, it was believed.” -1925

 

The Atlantic March 13, 2012

By Jennie Rothenberg Gritz, Interview with Andrew Nagorski,

Q: What did Americans think of Hitler when they first met him in the 1920s and 1930s? You write that some of them burst out laughing at his shrill voice and jerky hand movements and refused to take him seriously.

A: That’s true. You had Americans meeting Hitler and saying, “This guy is a clown. He’s like a caricature of himself” and “German politicians would somehow be able to control him.” A lot of German politicians believed it themselves.

However, some who met him did take him seriously.

  • Truman Smith (a junior military attaché in 1920) said, “This is a marvelous demagogue who can really inspire loyalty.”
  • Karl von Wiegand, a Hearst correspondent who interviewed Hitler in 1922, was struck by Hitler’s ability to whip people into a frenzy.
  • Edgar Mowrer, the Chicago Daily News correspondent, kept frantically trying to warn readers and the world, “What he’s saying about the Jews is serious. Don’t underestimate him.”

Right after Hitler took power there were attacks on Americans (living in Germany) who failed to give the Hitler salute.

If you look back to the very beginning of Hitler’s rhetoric about Jews, it was all there – the talk about extermination and vermin. He didn’t spell out exactly what would happen in the Holocaust, but he gave a pretty good indication of its overall thrust. When someone lobs those kinds of rhetorical bombs, it’s sort of a natural human tendency to say, “Oh, that’s just a figure of speech. They don’t really mean it. It’s just a way to whip up supporters.”

Even the German Jews didn’t seem to realize the danger they were facing.

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Andrew Nagorski, author of the new (in March 2012) book Hitlerland, discusses the way Americans saw — and wrote about — the early days of the Third Reich. 

THIS DAY IN HISTORY (January 30, 1934) – John Dillinger

Faribault Daily News

Heavily guarded, manacled and shackled, outlaw John Dillinger is shown on Jan. 30, 1934, as he is taken from one plane to another in St. Louis, Tenn., while under way to his final destination, Indiana jail at Crown Point. (AP Photo).

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He didn’t stay long.

Dillinger was caught in Tucson, Arizona on January 25, 1934. He was later escorted back to Indiana by Matthew Leach, the chief of the Indiana State Police, and imprisoned within the Crown Point jail.

The local police boasted to area newspapers that the jail was escape-proof and posted extra guards to make sure. What happened on the day of Dillinger’s escape on March 3rd is still open to debate.

Deputy Ernest Blunk claimed that Dillinger escaped using a real pistol, but FBI files make clear that Dillinger carved a fake pistol from a potato. -Source Wikipedia

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1920 Flappers Took the Country by Storm – But Did They Ever Truly Go Away

Women of the Roaring Twenties had a lot in common with today’s millennials

By Linda Simon Smithsonian Magazine September 2017

Flappers Atop Chicago Hotel

She was the sexy ingénue, spending evenings in jazz clubs hazy with her cigarette smoke. She cavorted, wild and willful, in the stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald, who summed her up as “pretty, impudent, superbly assured, as worldly-wise, briefly-clad and ‘hard-berled’ as possible.”

The glamorous, shimmering flapper in her slinky dress and stylish bob seemed to emerge into American life out of nowhere after the First World War, but the term was already familiar by then. In 1890s Britain, in fact, “flapper” described a very young prostitute, and after the turn of the century, it was used on both sides of the Atlantic for cheeky, prepubescent girls whose long braids, the New York Times reported, “flapped in the wind.” Soon, a flapper was any girl or woman who defied convention—girls who balked at being chaperoned, suffragists, women aspiring to a career, and those, as the Boston Globe put it, “expert in the arts of allurement.”

Unlike their mothers and grandmothers, flappers tended to go to high school and even college, and they devoured new books featuring confident, fun-loving adolescent heroines who hiked and camped and solved mysteries. Flappers biked, played golf and tennis, and strove to emulate the flat-chested and hipless physiques of the adolescent boys whose freedom and lack of domestic responsibilities they envied.

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Barney Oldfield

American race car driver Barney Oldfield was the first person to drive an automobile more than 60 miles per hour.

When he drove the car pictured below at 131.25 mph (1910), it was the fastest a human had ever traveled. [For reference: in 1913 airplanes had a average top speed ranging from 45 to 75 mph. The airspeed record was 126.67 mph.] 

At age 16, Oldfield began bicycle racing in 1894 when he entered his first race. Following the race, officials Dauntless bicycle factory asked him to ride for the Ohio state championship. Although he came in second, the race was a turning point and he was hired as a parts sales representative for the Stearns bicycle factory, where he met his future wife, Beatrice Lovetta Oatis; they married in 1896. By 1896, he was paid by Stearns in Syracuse New York, to race on its amateur team.

Oldfield was lent a gasoline-powered bicycle to race at Salt Lake City, which led to a meeting with Henry Ford, who had readied two automobiles for racing, and he asked Oldfield if he would like to test one at Ford’s Grosse Pointe track. Oldfield agreed and traveled to Michigan for the trial, but neither car started. Despite the fact that Oldfield had never even driven an automobile, he and fellow racing cyclist Tom Cooper purchased both test vehicles when Ford offered to sell them for $800. One of them was the famous “No. 999” that debuted in October 1902 at the Manufacturer’s Challenge Cup. Today it is displayed at the Henry Ford Museum in Greenfield Village. [Source Wikipedia]

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Molly Lambert’s Grandmother

My Grandmother, the Nazis, and the Shadow of the Olympics

by Molly Lambert Oct 1, 2017 The NewYorker

My (Molly Lambert) grandmother Margaret Bergmann was a born athlete. Self-taught and hyper-talented, she excelled at every sport she tried. She played sports with the boys, and they accepted her because she was by far the best athlete among them.  She did not think much about her Jewish identity until she was in her late teens, when the Nazis began their rise to power.

The Nazis

Suddenly signs reading “NO JEWS OR DOGS” were openly posted in windows. She was banned from athletic-training facilities she’d formerly had access to, and the kids at school began to beat up her younger brother for being Jewish. The family moved to London.

The 1936 Games were awarded to Weimar Germany, in 1931. Five years later, the National Socialist Party had seized full control of the German government, and Adolf Hitler inherited the ceremony. He was not initially sold on the Olympics—he thought that it was “an invention of Jews and Freemasons,” and that it was vulgar to let inferior races compete with the superior white one. But the German sports administrator Carl Diem convinced Hitler that the Olympics were a grand opportunity to showcase Nazi propaganda and demonstrate Germany’s growing power.

Recalled to Germany, Margaret Bergmann wanted to demonstrate that Jews were not inferior, and she wanted to win because she was the best high jumper alive. But, shortly before the Games, the Nazis dropped my grandmother from the roster, convinced that they no longer needed token Jewish athletes. Bergmann received a letter from the Nazis, telling her that she was being cut because she was not up to par—a lie, as scores from the time demonstrate. The letter was signed “Heil Hitler.”

Bergmann was furious that she would not be able to prove that she was the superior Jewish body that the Nazis did not believe existed. She was also glad to get out of Germany immediately.

She worked as a maid while trying to get her parents safely to New York, and she was thrilled when Jesse Owens won gold in Berlin: a black athlete, from her newly adopted country of America, proving that the Nazi ideology and all white supremacy are built on bullshit. She competed in America for a few years, winning American titles in the high jump and shot put. She wanted to train for the 1940 Olympics, but she chose to stop competing after the outbreak of the Second World War.

Margaret Bergman Lambert lived to a hundred and three years old, which is a great way to say “Fuck you” to Nazis.

The Shadow of the Olympics

During the 1984 Games, the Los Angeles Police Department, led by Chief Daryl Gates, swept neighborhoods and arrested hundreds of black and brown youth, “ostensibly to minimize gang crime during the Games.” This was a landmark moment in the militarization of American police.

Now ICE is conducting raids in Los Angeles. These raids began before Trump became President, but they have become bolder, more aggressively public.

There is a climate of fear now in Los Angeles: people are encouraged to snitch on their neighbors; families are separated by police in front of a school in broad daylight. I (Molly Lambert) think of the stories my grandmother told of being exiled from her own home town, a place she’d truly loved.

Read the entire article

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